Friday, 17 August 2012

Miriam Newman: The Eagle's Woman

Please welcome the multi-talented Miriam Newman. I've only met Miriam recently but found she's one of those kindred spirits one is lucky to come across in a lifetime. She's a lovely woman with wide-ranging talents and interests, many of which include helping those in need through social work and animal rescue. She's also an avid traveler and voracious reader.

My first introduction to Miriam's work came with her historical romance called The Comet, which is the story of a Norman knight who's wounded at the Battle of Hastings and nursed back to health by Saxon woman, as is her Christian duty. But her growing love for the Norman scares her, as does her sudden marriage to the man, and she runs home to her family across the Borders for protection. She doesn't expect her new husband to come for her. Lots of action and intrigue here!

Miriam's newly released book, The Eagle's Woman, is book one of The Eagle series. Ari is the son of an impoverished Norse chieftain. Why his father lays dying, Ari takes to raiding as a means to support and feed his people. Ari develops a notorious reputation, someone whom is feared beyond measure. He's a Pagan and therefor a heathen in the eyes of the Church, yet he spares priests during his raids, and any Christian woman who falls in love with him will be committing a sin in the eyes of God. Which is fine with Ari, as his life as a warrior doesn't have time for women or love.

During a raid to Ireland, Ari abducts Maeve from the peaceful fishing village where she lives, and from that moment, every belied he had in himself is called into question the moment he's alone with this woman.

Something tells me Miriam relishes a great, action-packed historical!

I had the pleasure of chatting with Miriam about life behind the pen. She lets us into her sanctuary for a peak.

Hi Miriam. Thanks for visiting with us today. Please, describe your writing space.

In my little two bedroom Victorian cottage, I have turned one of the bedrooms into my office. A nice solid desk sits tucked into an alcove beneath a picture of a steeplechase race in Aiken, S.C., to the side of another picture representing a typical Chester County foxhunting scene. Would you guess that I live in Horse Country? On the right-hand wall is a picture of my husband on the 37 horse farm where we lived just after we were married. The remaining walls are splashed with framed book covers—all 14 of them!  It looks like a romance Rogues’ Gallery. Finally against the fourth wall an overloaded bookcase is on the point of collapse, suffocating under the weight of research books. If it over-balances, it will fall on the FAX machine roosting on its spindly stand.  Eek! Oh, yes, and my pit bull puppy is asleep on my feet after an altercation with the cat that wore her out. Meanwhile, I am attempting to write. 

Sounds like you're a nester . . . collecting all your best-loved items around you and making a comfortable environment for your writing.

What is your daily writing routine like? 

It usually happens in the middle of the night because I work two jobs and write when I should be sleeping. Everything looks as described above except that at that point the puppy has despaired of my coming to bed and gone to sleep on it! She will wake again at 5 a.m., when I have been asleep for three hours.

So, you're a night writer too! You're one busy lady! I don't know how you fit it all in. What do you enjoy doing when you're not writing?


Sleeping! There is so little time for it and some of my best ideas come in dreams. I also love to travel and will be going to Ireland on vacation at the end of September.

How wonderful! You'll be on my turf soon. Maybe we can hook up for a face-to-face! Thanks for stopping by today.

So, here it is . . . an excerpt for The Eagle's Woman. You can tell by the cover, Ari is one sexy Norseman!

• • •
“What?” Ari asked, reaching with his free hand to take her chin in it. His thumb caressed her bottom lip and she thought she was not out of danger with him, no matter how disheveled her appearance. This man wanted her, no doubt of it. Not enough to commit violence on her, apparently, but she thought gentleness held its own dangers. If she was not careful, it could weaken her will. He was not unattractive—with fair skin, strong angular features and striking eyes—though just then he looked like a drowned rat as all of them did. It did not obscure the strength of his body or the keen intelligence in those eyes. She turned her head to the side, dislodging his thumb.

“I have not seen tears from you before,” he said thoughtfully, “though many of the others are crying. What has finally broken you?”
 

“I am not broken,” she spat, “only mourning two good people who raised me. But I am sure you know nothing of such feelings.”
 

He sat back on his heels. “Do I not? Two good people raised me as well. One lies crippled in his sickbed and the other waits for me to bring coin to buy things a sick man needs.”
 

Maeve was silent, surprised and momentarily chastened. She had never seriously supposed he had motives other than greed.
 

“Do you think raiding is worthy of a fighting man?” he persisted. “I would rather face an army than hungry children.”
 

She stifled an impulse toward sympathy. “Ours are dead or captive. You seem to have no trouble facing that.”
 

Abruptly, he set both feet beneath himself and got up, undaunted by the motion of the ship which made such things impossible for Maeve. She had not noticed a wineskin hanging from the rigging, but she saw him reach for it then. “I cannot help your children.” He took a fulsome swig. “Just mine.” Wiping the neck with his wet tunic, he held the wineskin out to her.
 

It was decent wine, probably from their monastery, tasting of strength and summer. She needed strength to remember that summer would come again, so she drank.

• • •

Fantasy poetry driven by myths and legends has been Miriam’s passion for as long as she can remember.  She was published in poetry before catching the romance writing bug.  She brings that background to her writing along with a lifelong addiction to horses, an 18 year career in various areas of psychiatric social services and many trips to Ireland, where she nurtures her muse.  Her published works range from contemporary fantasy romance to fantasy historical, futuristic, science fiction and historical romance.  Currently she lives in rural Pennsylvania with a “motley crew” of rescue animals.  You can view her books at www.miriamnewman.com.

• • •

For more information on The Eagle's Woman and Miriam Newman, readers are invited to visit these sites. Miriam loves hearing from her readers, so drop her a note --

Miriam's website - http://www.miriamnewman.com
Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/miriam.newman1
Dark Castle Lords Publications - http://thedarkcastlelords.net/?page_id=502

---} And if you want to buy a copy of The Eagle's Woman, you can find a copy on Amazon Kindle, or drop over to Fictionwise or All Romance Books.




25 comments:

  1. Welcome, Miriam. It's great having you here today.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kemberlee. You have a beautiful blog here! Thanks for inviting me. I hope it has stopped raining by now. I'm due over in five weeks--can't wait!

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    2. When you get a chance, let me know what your dates are and if you'll be around the Kildare area.

      Thanks about the blog. Just reread the article and can't believe my typos. Holy moly!!!! I'll fix it in the AM when I'm back my PC again. Sorry about that.

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    3. When you get a chance, let me know what your dates are and if you'll be around the Kildare area.

      Thanks about the blog. Just reread the article and can't believe my typos. Holy moly!!!! I'll fix it in the AM when I'm back my PC again. Sorry about that.

      Delete
  2. I enjoyed your interview, Miriam. Good pictures, too! I can visualize you in your office, writing. Best of luck with The Eagle's Woman. The book is on my Kindle and I look forward to reading it soon.

    Best-Adele

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  3. Great picture next to those horses. Looks like a museum of some kind. Your life sounds fuller than full, Miriam, and I can see why sleep is so important since you have so many jobs! Your writing space is something I wish I had - so serene and homey. Good luck with your books.
    Patti

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  4. Miriam, I ah so glad I found you on Kemberlee's beautiful blog.
    I wish you all the sales you deserve for The Eagle's Woman, but you know that for me there will always be your COMET - a luminous book.

    Love, KATE

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  5. Thanks for the comments, ladies. The office is a little the worse for wear what with a chewing puppy in there, but we're managing! The pictures were taken at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. My friend Denise who took them was joking that I can't get away from horses anywhere! Kate, you'll be happy to know I'm starting to envision my characters in The Eagle as ancestors of my character Neel in The Comet! The more I research, the more I'm starting to see this as a sort of spider-web of history.

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  6. Oh wow, Miriam, that is great news. And do I see another book with Néel as the hero? Yes please, pretty please!
    Do you know how rare it is for one writer to wish she had written another writer's book? Well, I sure wished I had written Néel! And that is the highest compliment of all.

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  7. Thanks, Kate. Right now I don't know WHERE all this will end! But I
    am having a good time finding out.

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  8. Hi Miriam - Great interview! I also tend to be a night person (I get my best writing done in the middle of the night)...but I also need my sleep, so I'm always in conflict there. I'm amazed that you have the energy to hold down two jobs and write in the middle of the night...more power to you! Your books sound interesting - I wish you all the best sales!

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  9. Gorgeous blog, Kemberlee! Courage, Miriam. I'm afraid Kemberlee has been hit by a bad Irish summer down in Kildare. I've been living with rain forecasts in western Ireland for the last three weeks, and we've only had two rainy days. I have a tan! Sort of. Readers, I've read several of Miriam's books. They're wonderful adventures. Can't wait to delve into the latest. Write on, Miriam!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pat, Yeah, this part of the country has seen some horrible weather. Huge wintery storm on Wed. Now it's just horribly humid. Ick!!! Scattered rains and dark grey sky. You'd swear it was Nov but the trees are still green!

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  10. Miriam, what a gorgeous cover! Of course, I hardly noticed the bare-chested, and beautifully muscled man. **clears throat as cheeks heat up**

    I used to be a write anywhere and anytime person until I realized I've become a senior citizen and concentration flew out the window, lol.

    Very nice interview and excerpt, Miriam.

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  11. Thanks for your comments, everyone. Here's hoping I return from Ireland with the muse in a good mood. If not, I'm dumping her off in a peat bog somewhere (shh, don't tell!). Although she probably wouldn't mind. She loves it over there.

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    Replies
    1. We live beside Monasterevin Bog. My muse visits there often! Maybe ours can collaborate together and come back with some ideas ;-)

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  12. Kemberlee, my dates are September 26 (27th your time) to Oct. 3. We're coming into Shannon, heading for Adare and Dingle, circling through Clare and back to Bunratty. Not too near you, I'm afraid. I'm thinking we'll go east on the next trip because by then I'll need to get to the National Museum in Dublin for their Viking exhibit.

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    Replies
    1. Ah! I remember now. West coast tour this time. Yep, would be great for you to see the Viking exhibit at the National Museum. I might just have to go in there for you ;-) But DO give me a ring when you're here (let me know if I gave you my number) so we can have a chat. Just ask Pat, I'll talk your ear off! :-D

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  13. I hope you have a wonderful trip, Miriam. I still think you need to giveaway bedroom wall murals of your book cover. ;-)

    By the way, if my muse doesn't shape up soon, would you mind booting her off into the bog along with yours?

    Safe travels!

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  14. Hi Miriam. Great cover. Your story sound quite interesting and I bet even more fun to read. Good luck with lots of readers.

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  15. Hi to the Celtic Hearts ladies! Thanks for stopping by. I appreciate Kemberlee's kind comments and how much care she took with this interview. Maeve, I would love to butt-kick some muses, they've kicked me around enough. Ours could stand being cut down to size a bit, the arrogant hussies. And I will definitely keep the wall paper in mind!

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  16. Hi Miriam, I loved the cover and the interview. Congratulations on your book!

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  17. Thank you, Ella. I can't write the sequel fast enough.

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